Thought for the Week – 11.12.17

“Live as if you were to die tomorrow. Learn as if you were to live forever”

MAHATMA GANDHI (1869-1948)

Mahātmā Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi (2 October 1869 – 30 January 1948) was the leader of the Indian independence movement against British rule. Employing nonviolent civil disobedience, Gandhi led India to independence and inspired movements for civil rights and freedom across the world. The honorific Mahātmā applied to him first in 1914 in South Africa is now used worldwide.

Born and raised in a Hindu merchant caste family in coastal Gujarat, western India, and trained in law at the Inner Temple, London, Gandhi first employed nonviolent civil disobedience as an expatriate lawyer in South Africa, in the resident Indian community’s struggle for civil rights. After his return to India in 1915, he set about organising peasants, farmers, and urban labourers to protest against excessive land-tax and discrimination. Assuming leadership of the Indian National Congress in 1921, Gandhi led nationwide campaigns for various social causes and for achieving Swaraj or self-rule.

Gandhi famously led Indians in challenging the British-imposed salt tax with the 400 km (250 mi) Dandi Salt March in 1930, and later in calling for the British to Quit India in 1942. He was imprisoned for many years, upon many occasions, in both South Africa and India. He lived modestly in a self-sufficient residential community and wore the traditional Indian dhoti and shawl, woven with yarn hand-spun on a charkha. He ate simple vegetarian food, and also undertook long fasts as a means of both self-purification and political protest.

Gandhi’s vision of an independent India based on religious pluralism, however, was challenged in the early 1940s by a new Muslim nationalism which was demanding a separate Muslim homeland carved out of India. Eventually, in August 1947, Britain granted independence, but the British Indian Empire was partitioned into two dominions, a Hindu-majority India and Muslim-majority Pakistan. As many displaced Hindus, Muslims, and Sikhs made their way to their new lands, religious violence broke out, especially in the Punjab and Bengal. Eschewing the official celebration of independence in Delhi, Gandhi visited the affected areas, attempting to provide solace. In the months following, he undertook several fasts unto death to stop religious violence. The last of these, undertaken on 12 January 1948 when he was 78, also had the indirect goal of pressuring India to pay out some cash assets owed to Pakistan. Some Indians thought Gandhi was too accommodating. Among them was Nathuram Godse, a Hindu nationalist, who assassinated Gandhi on 30 January 1948 by firing three bullets into his chest.

Gandhi’s birthday, 2 October, is commemorated in India as Gandhi Jayanti, a national holiday, and worldwide as the International Day of Nonviolence.

Do Something Great for AGS… SHOP!

Happy Christmas and welcome to the last PTA email of 2017.  Thank you so much for all your help over the last twelve months, you have been amazing.  We have one last thing to ask.

A lot of AGS parents do their online shopping through The Giving Machine website and apps to help raise much needed funds for the school.  But if every family at AGS joined The Giving Machine today, and spent £200 over Christmas and January, it would raise over £3,000 for the school and cost you absolutely nothing. 

Simply click the link and follow instructions nominating AGS as your charity.

https://www.thegivingmachine.co.uk

Thanks so much.

Have a wonderful Chrimbo and a very happy new year.

 

The PTA

Turn Your Last-Minute Xmas Shopping into Cash for AGS

You can raise funds for the AGS simply by using the Giving Machine to access your favourite online shops.  Every time you make a qualifying purchase via TheGivingMachine website, a sales commission is generated. With the addition of Gift Aid, up to 75% is converted into a free donation for AGS. There are over 2000 retailers who are part of this including Amazon, eBay, Sainsbury’s, Next, John Lewis, M&S, Argos and Trainline + more.  Here’s what you need to do.

  1. Go to thegivingmachine.co.uk and sign up. It will ask you to nominate a charity, you just need to put down Aylesbury Grammar School.
  2. Once your account is up-and-running just click the store icon you want to shop in and you will be taken there. It won’t look any different to how it normally looks.
  3. There is an app for phones and tablets called ‘Shop and Give’. Again, once you’re signed up just remember to buy through the app.

 

Thank you so much, imagine how much money we’d raise if every parent at AGS bought all their on-line goods through the Giving Machine. If you have any problems then please call the PTA helpline on 07714 837030.

Happy shopping and thank you for all your support

The PTA

Like Quizzes? Adore Curry? Then HURRY HURRY HURRY!

PTA QUIZ & CURRY NIGHT – SATURDAY 3 MARCH 2018

The AGS Quiz and Curry Night is one of the fastest selling nights of the year and for good reason.  Who doesn’t like answering questions like “what was the first Mister Men book?”, “which individual has won the most Oscars?”, and “can you name the world’s largest desert?”, while stuffing their face with delicious curry?

Secure your tickets by simply filling in the form (See flyer below) and handing it in to the school office before the 19th of Feb, 2018.  You can pay by Parent Pay or by cheque but act quickly to avoid disappointment.

PTA QUIZ NIGHT FLYER 2017

Thanks so much,

The PTA

Oh, and it’s Mr Tickle, Walt Disney and Antarctica, in case you were wondering.

Thought for the Week 04.12.17

“Insanity; doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results”

ALBERT EINSTEIN (1879 – 1955)

Albert Einstein (14 March 1879 – 18 April 1955) was a German-born theoretical physicist. Einstein developed the theory of relativity, one of the two pillars of modern physics (alongside quantum mechanics). Einstein’s work is also known for its influence on the philosophy of science. Einstein is best known by the general public for his mass–energy equivalence formula E = mc2 (which has been dubbed “the world’s most famous equation”). He received the 1921 Nobel Prize in Physics “for his services to theoretical physics, and especially for his discovery of the law of the photoelectric effect”, a pivotal step in the evolution of quantum theory.

Near the beginning of his career, Einstein thought that Newtonian mechanics was no longer enough to reconcile the laws of classical mechanics with the laws of the electromagnetic field. This led him to develop his special theory of relativity during his time at the Swiss Patent Office in Bern (1902–1909), Switzerland. However, he realised that the principle of relativity could also be extended to gravitational fields and—with his subsequent theory of gravitation in 1916—he published a paper on general relativity. He continued to deal with problems of statistical mechanics and quantum theory, which led to his explanations of particle theory and the motion of molecules. He also investigated the thermal properties of light which laid the foundation of the photon theory of light. In 1917, Einstein applied the general theory of relativity to model the large-scale structure of the universe.

Between 1895 and 1914, he lived in Switzerland (except for one year in Prague, 1911–12), where he received his academic diploma from the Swiss Federal Polytechnic in Zürich (later the Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule, ETH) in 1900. He later taught there at the same institute as a professor of theoretical physics between 1912 and 1914 before he left for Berlin. In 1901, after being stateless for more than five years, Einstein acquired Swiss citizenship, which he kept for the rest of his life. In 1905, Einstein was awarded a PhD by the University of Zürich. The same year, his annus mirabilis (miracle year), he published four groundbreaking papers, which were to bring him to the notice of the academic world, at the age of 26.

He was visiting the United States when Adolf Hitler came to power in 1933 and—being Jewish—did not go back to Germany, where he had been a professor at the Berlin Academy of Sciences. He settled in the United States, becoming an American citizen in 1940. On the eve of World War II, he endorsed a letter to President Franklin D. Roosevelt alerting him to the potential development of “extremely powerful bombs of a new type” and recommending that the U.S. begin similar research. This eventually led to what would become the Manhattan Project. Einstein supported defending the Allied forces, but generally denounced the idea of using the newly discovered nuclear fission as a weapon. Later, with the British philosopher Bertrand Russell, Einstein signed the Russell–Einstein Manifesto, which highlighted the danger of nuclear weapons. Einstein was affiliated with the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey, until his death in 1955.

Einstein published more than 300 scientific papers along with over 150 non-scientific works. Einstein’s intellectual achievements and originality have made the word “Einstein” synonymous with “genius”.